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Treaty no. 9 : making the agreement to share the land in far northern Ontario in 1905 / John S. Long Share Link
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LEADER_07  m
001  36851
003  CaOTARL
005  2021-07-22
020    a9780773537606 (bound) 
020    a9780773537613 (pbk.)
041    aeng
100  1 aLong, John,d1948-
245  10aTreaty no. 9 :bmaking the agreement to share the land in far northern Ontario in 1905 /cJohn S. Long
260    aMontreal :bMcGill-Queen's University Press,c2010.
300    axx, 601 pages :billustrations, maps ;c.25 cm
490  1 aRupert's Land Record Society series ;v12
504    aIncludes bibliographical references (p. [521]-575) and index.
505  0 aHistorical Context: Treaty-Making before 1905 -- Requests for Annuities, 1884–1905 -- Planning and Negotiating, 1901–1905 -- Ratification and Early Implementation -- Treaty-Making Resumes -- Sharing the Land --  Historical Documents: The Treaty Party and the Sources -- Beginnings -- Lac Seul (Obishikokaang) -- Osnaburgh (Mishkeegogamang) -- Fort Hope (Eabametoong) -- Marten Falls -- English River -- Fort Albany -- Moose Factory -- New Post -- Abitibi -- Endings -- The Last of the Indian Treaties -- The Treaty Doctor’s Report -- Education -- Formal Treaty Documents --  Trick of Treaty No. 9: Making the Agreement to Share the Land in 1905 -- Parchments and Promises -- Afterword / Pauline M.R. Rickard.
520  0 a"For more than a century, the vast lands of Northern Ontario have been shared among the governments of Canada, Ontario, and the First Nations who signed Treaty No. 9 in 1905. For just as long, details about the signing of the constitutionally recognized agreement have been known only through the accounts of two of the commissioners appointed by the Government of Canada. Treaty No. 9 provides a truer perspective on the treaty by adding the neglected account of a third commissioner and tracing the treaty's origins, negotiation, explanation, interpretation, signing, implementation, and recent commemoration. Restoring nearly forgotten perspectives to the historical record, John Long considers the methods used by the government of Canada to explain Treaty No. 9 to Northern Ontario First Nations. He shows that many crucial details about the treaty's contents were omitted in the transmission of writing to speech, while other promises were made orally but not included in the written
treaty. Reproducing the three treaty commissioners' personal journals in their entirety, Long reveals the contradictions that suggest the treaty parchment was never fully explained to the First Nations who signed it".
610  10aCanada.tTreaties, etc.d(1905 July 12)
650   4aCreezOntariovTreatiesxHistory.
650   4aOjibwezOntariovTreatiesxHistory.
650   4aCreezOntarioxGovernment relations.
650   4aOjibwezOntarioxGovernment relations.
650   0aIndigenous peopleszCanadaxGovernment relationsy1860-1951.
650   0aAboriginal titlezCanada.

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Name(s):

Publication Details:

  • Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, 2010.

Description:

  • xx, 601 pages : illustrations, maps ; .25 cm

Series:

  • Rupert's Land Record Society series ; 12

Notes:

  • Includes bibliographical references (p. [521]-575) and index.

Contents:

  • Historical Context: Treaty-Making before 1905 -- Requests for Annuities, 1884–1905 -- Planning and Negotiating, 1901–1905 -- Ratification and Early Implementation -- Treaty-Making Resumes -- Sharing the Land -- Historical Documents: The Treaty Party and the Sources -- Beginnings -- Lac Seul (Obishikokaang) -- Osnaburgh (Mishkeegogamang) -- Fort Hope (Eabametoong) -- Marten Falls -- English River -- Fort Albany -- Moose Factory -- New Post -- Abitibi -- Endings -- The Last of the Indian Treaties -- The Treaty Doctor’s Report -- Education -- Formal Treaty Documents -- Trick of Treaty No. 9: Making the Agreement to Share the Land in 1905 -- Parchments and Promises -- Afterword / Pauline M.R. Rickard.

Abstract:

  • "For more than a century, the vast lands of Northern Ontario have been shared among the governments of Canada, Ontario, and the First Nations who signed Treaty No. 9 in 1905. For just as long, details about the signing of the constitutionally recognized agreement have been known only through the accounts of two of the commissioners appointed by the Government of Canada. Treaty No. 9 provides a truer perspective on the treaty by adding the neglected account of a third commissioner and tracing the treaty's origins, negotiation, explanation, interpretation, signing, implementation, and recent commemoration. Restoring nearly forgotten perspectives to the historical record, John Long considers the methods used by the government of Canada to explain Treaty No. 9 to Northern Ontario First Nations. He shows that many crucial details about the treaty's contents were omitted in the transmission of writing to speech, while other promises were made orally but not included in the written treaty. Reproducing the three treaty commissioners' personal journals in their entirety, Long reveals the contradictions that suggest the treaty parchment was never fully explained to the First Nations who signed it".

Subject(s):

Record ID: 36851